Art Department

Rockville Campus
Art Department
Art Department

 

Sarah Silberman Art Gallery
Sarah Silberman Art Gallery, Rockville Campus

The Gallery is located on the second floor of the Paul Peck Art Building on the Rockville Campus.Gallery hours during exhibitions are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. (except for college holidays).

Gallery Schedule

Apply for Artist-in-Residence Program

The Rockville Art Department serves over 1500 students with 110 courses each semester.  Our students create in 11 well-equipped studios, each dedicated to a specific area of study. We are housed in the four-story Paul Peck Art Building, which features a sleek 960 square foot gallery.

Our faculty come from a variety of artistic backgrounds. In addition to being committed to their students, the faculty members are accomplished artists and researchers who exhibit or publish nationally and internationally.

Meet Our Faculty and Staff

Courses by Subject


ArtWalk

Artwalk 2019 sculpture

The Rockville Art Department’s annual ArtWalk takes place each April on the campus grounds. ArtWalk by individual students and class collaborations can be seen around the campus for one week.

Artist in Residence

Artist in Residence Stephanie Mercedes

The three-week Artist in Residence program (AIR) of the Rockville Art Department augments the studio arts curriculum by providing students with direct hands-on experience in the arts that is guided by visiting artists.

Areas of Study

Art History is comprised of introductory Art Appreciation (ARTT127), Art History: Ancient to 1400 (ARTT200), Art History: 1400 to present (ARTT201), Architectural History to 1400 (ARTT265), Architectural History 1400 to Present (ARTT266) and four specialty courses: Survey of Asian Art (ARTT272), Italian Renaissance Art (ARTT275), American Art(ARTT279) and Modern Art: Its Origins and Development (ARTT280).

Each of these courses is a lecture/discussion taught with visual images. Art Appreciation addresses art of all periods from around the world and introduces students to the methods, materials, symbols and meaning that one finds in the history of art. The art history courses are taught chronologically. Art History: Ancient to 1400 examines art from cave paintings through the Gothic period. Art History: 1400 to present begins with the Renaissance and covers art to the present day. Art Appreciation, Art History: Ancient to 1400, and Art History: 1400 to present are offered every semester and summer session. The architectural history surveys are offered every term, one in the evening and one during the day; they alternate semesters. The specialized courses are offered in rotation with Asian Art in the fall and Modern Art in the spring.

Contact:  Professor Ken Jassie     240-567-5245

Ceramics

The following courses are offered in the Ceramics program: Ceramics I (ARTT120), which is primarily devoted to handbuilding, Ceramics II (ARTT220), which is primarily devoted to wheelthrowing, and Practicum I and II (ARTT255D and ARTT256D) which are special courses for students continuing their ceramic studies for credit.

All classes are oriented toward a creative problem solving process via the introduction of various ceramic skills needed to solve those problems. The development of critical thinking and writing skills are also an important element of each course. The intent of each ceramics course is to foster skill enhancement, idea development and an appreciation for ceramics as a significant expressive media. The full range of ceramic possibilities from pottery to sculptural expression is encouraged and supported.

The classes are taught in a lecture and studio session format. A limited amount of clay and glaze materials are available to each student. Each student enrolled in a course is expected to supply their own tools, however there are no studio fees. The facility is amply equipped with an extruder, a slab roller, kilns, wheels, tables, shelves and storage space for student work.

Contact:  Professor Sara Parent-Ramos    240-567-7641

See sample student Ceramics artwork.

Lynne Goss

Color Theory and Application (ARTT105) is a foundation art course that introduces students to the expressive and decorative aspects of color. The course is taught in a studio format where students learn to manipulate color through demonstrations of media technique and they discuss their projects in critique.  

Contact:  Professor Michael Sellmeyer     240-567-7653

See sample student Color Theory artwork.

Yiping Zhu

Crafts (ARTT123) provides a foundation of working in processes such as metalsmithing, enameling, ceramics, fiber craft, basketry, or paper craft. (See section notes for each section’s material emphasis).

While cultivating respect for craft, students create functional or nonfunctional objects while they explore material as an artform. Students analyze the social and ethical aspects within craft as they develop technical competency. Coursework encourages an investigation into the potential of objects to possess visual, tactile, and conceptual information. Creative design and technical craftsmanship are emphasized.  No prior experience required. 

Sections Emphasis include: Metal, Texture and Form, Color, Surface, and Enameling
Individual Art Workshop (ARTT257J)  can be taken after enrolling in at least one section of Crafts with instructor's permission. Students choosing to enroll in this course should have previous knowledge in the Emphasis the section is focused on. Students are asked to submit project proposals, semester goals, and a final reflection upon completion of the course. Students enrolled in Individual Art Workshop should have an interest in intellectual, conceptual, and technical growth as an artist and craftsperson, and be open to receiving critical feedback from their instructor and peers. Students will be asked to be an active member of the classroom including participation in class discussions on assigned readings or videos, as well as class critiques.

Contact:  Professor Lucy Derickson     240-567-4419  

See sample student Crafts artwork.

Katie Tocknell

Design is recommended to art students as one of their beginning courses of study.  

Introduction to 2D Design (ARTT102), is for students who have had little or no previous art training. It is taught in a lecture and studio format. Students become involved with principles of organization and structure in two-dimensional works. Using line, shape, color, value and texture, students solve aesthetic problems with spatial relationships, experiment with different media, and most importantly, analyze, write about and discuss the decision making process in art. The student's portfolio reflects the conceptual and imaginative aspects of art as well as technical understanding of presentation and the media.

Introduction to 3D Design (ARTT103), continues exploration and problem solving with elements of art and principles of design in the three-dimensional area. Students design projects dealing with mass, line, color and texture using simple materials such as paper, mat board, styrofoam, plexiglass, clay, plaster and wood. Students are encouraged to relate their experiments in three-dimensional design to their primary art interests - stage/set design, display, sculpture, architecture/interior design, landscape architecture or environmental art. The course addresses the portrayal of three-dimensional subject matter in two-dimensional art areas such as photography, advertising art and graphic design.

The Art Department's design studio is located in room 135 of the Technical Center Building. It is well equipped with a variety of materials and equipment.

Contact:  Professor David Krueger     240-567-7935 

See sample student Design artwork.

Taleetha Williams

The Drawing area offers courses in still life, portraiture and the figure, with instruction focusing on representational drawing and skill building. Students are introduced to various media including charcoal, conté, pencil, pen/ink and wash. Assignments deal with proportion, perspective and visual elements of art such as line, value and shape.

Introduction to Drawing (ARTT100) is concerned primarily with still life and is followed by Intermediate Drawing (ARTT204) which emphasizes more complex problem solving, or Figure Drawing 1 (ARTT205) which focuses on the human figure; students work from nude models. Figure Drawing 2 (ARTT206) also focuses on drawing from models and emphasizes more complex problem solving and media use. Further credit course work in drawing is provided through various Practicum courses (ARTT255A and ARTT256A) for example, Portrait Drawing and Pastel. There are three drawing studios that offer both natural and controlled artificial lighting.

Contact:  Professor Molly Nuzzo     240-567-7639

See sample student Drawing artwork.

Marta Zarzeka

Jewelry and Metalsmithing (ARTT245) provides a foundation in fabrication with sheet metals such as copper, brass, or silver. Students will learn a variety of introductory techniques including traditional and contemporary tools and materials.

This course is built on the understanding that jewelry has intrinsic value and that jewelry is a powerful means of collecting and transmuting personal experience. In this course students analyze historical, social and ethical aspects within Jewelry and Metalsmithing as they develop technical competency, and explore material as an artform. Creative design and technical craftsmanship are emphasized. *No prior experience required.

Practicum I and II (ARTT255G and 256G) can be taken after at least one semester of Jewelry and Metalsmithing, with permission of the instructor. Practicum courses allow for further exploration of Jewelry and Metalsmithing processes in an assignment based curriculum. Practicum topics rotate each semester. 

While cultivating respect for craft, students create functional or nonfunctional objects while they explore material as an art form. Students analyze the social and ethical aspects within craft as they develop technical competency. Coursework encourages an investigation into the potential of objects to possess visual, tactile, and conceptual information. Creative design and technical craftsmanship are emphasized. This course can be retaken multiple times with instructor permission.

Individual Art Workshop (ARTT257G) can be taken after enrolling in Practicum I and II. Students choosing to enroll in this course should have a breadth of knowledge in the field of Jewelry and Metalsmithing and be able to work independently. Students are asked to submit project proposals, semester goals, and a final reflection upon completion of the course. Students enrolled in Individual Art Workshop should have an interest in intellectual, conceptual, and technical growth as an artist and crafts person, and be open to receiving critical feedback from their instructor and peers. Students will be asked to be an active member of the classroom including participation in class discussions on assigned readings or videos, as well as class critiques.

Contact:  Professor Lucy Derickson     240-567-4419

See sample student Jewelry and Metalsmith artwork.

Mi Hwa Rhee

The Painting program offers students instruction in oil, watercolor, acrylic, egg tempera and monotype, in realist and abstract styles. Courses build upon skills learned in Drawing and Design. The painting classes are taught in studios which are well furnished with both equipment and supplies.

The materials and techniques used with oil are introduced in Painting I (ARTT211). Instruction in proper sizing and priming of a canvas is given. Some sections of Painting I are devoted entirely to acrylic technique. Painting II (ARTT212) is a further development of the skills learned in Painting I with an emphasis on more complex assignments.

Watercolor l (ARTT215) is an introduction to the materials and techniques of transparent watercolor painting. Assignments are given in dry brush, wash and wet in wet techniques. Watercolor ll (ARTT216) is a further development of the skills learned in Watercolor l with an emphasis on more complex assignments.

Contact:  Professor Sumita Kim     240-567-1775 

See sample student Painting artwork.

Choney Nelson

The printmaking area offers courses in the following disciplines: Intaglio (ARTT230), Woodcut (ARTT225), Lithography (ARTT227) and Monotype (ARTT226). These courses employ both traditional and contemporary processes.

Students are encouraged to explore their own personal imagery while addressing particular technical challenges. Group and individual critiques insure a continual dialogue with faculty and other students. Class participants are informed about the advantages of producing multiple original prints and learn professional presentation methods. Practicum (ARTT255C, ARTT256C and ARTT257C) students may pursue independent directions with the consent of the instructor.

The printmaking facilities include three etching presses and four lithographic presses situated in a safe and well maintained print shop. Students enjoy a large collection of quality lithographic stones, a well ventilated acid etching room and a separate plate cleaning and processing area. The printmaking area has three Macintosh computers with large studio monitors, a large format scanner, and a large format printer. All of the computers have direct Internet access and are used to compliment the traditional printmaking processes.

Monotype Workshop (ARTT226) is an exploration of the monotype process with an emphasis on individual experimentation and expression. 

A monitor system is used to allow students additional access to the print shop. Field trips, slide lectures and visiting artist programs further inform students about printmaking and enrich their experience.

Contact:  Professor John Carr     240-567-7652

See sample student Printmaking artwork.

Maria Martinez

The Sculpture program offers students instruction in clay, terracotta, stone carving, woodcarving, mold making and casting and mixed media construction. The full range of sculptural expression from representational to abstract is encouraged.

The classes are taught in a lecture and studio format that integrates individual and class criticism of work. The development of critical thinking with references to art history and to traditional and contemporary sculptural concepts is an important element of each course.

Practicum I and II are special courses for students who have completed Sculpture II, and who want to further develop their skills with an emphasis on content and advanced sculptural techniques

Contact:  Professor Zdeno Mayercak     240-567-7640

See sample student Sculpture artwork.

Krueger faculty artwork
Painting by faculty member David Krueger

Faculty Artwork

The Rockville Campus Art Department consists of 12 full-time professors and 25 part-time professors who come from a variety of artistic backgrounds. In addition to being committed to their students, the faculty are accomplished artists and researchers who exhibit or publish nationally and internationally. See artwork by our faculty.


Student Resources


Noncredit Courses and Training

Community Arts provides noncredit classes for professional and aspiring artists, taught by working artists. We build our schedule based on community needs and interests, so we'd love to hear from you! Find out more.

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