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10th Annual Humanities Days at Montgomery College

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The Power of the Humanities to Sustain and Serve

October 24 - 28, 2022
Virtual and In-Person Events

Humanities Days questions? Please contact us at: HumanitiesDays@montgomerycollege.edu


Humanities Days

October 24 - 28, 2022

Welcome to Montgomery College's 10th annual Humanities Days celebration!  This annual weeklong series of events is sponsored by the Global Humanities Institute and the Paul Peck Humanities Institute of Montgomery College. 
 
The humanities help us understand ourselves and others through language, history, and culture. They have the capacity to foster social justice and equality and they reveal how people throughout time have tried to make moral, spiritual, and intellectual sense of the world.  

Presentations, Dialogues, Workshops, and Panels

This year's theme, The Power of the Humanities to Sustain and Serve speaks to the significance of the Humanities in our personal, academic and professional lives. Inspiration in the form of discovering our histories, expressing our stories through art and literature, and connecting to past and present big ideas about our human experience can be a lifeline in times of need and a source of lifelong joy and sustenance.  We hope that this year's programming educates, inspires and encourages participants to celebrate life through the Humanities.

Last year's recordings for the 2021 program theme, The Human in Humanities: Understanding Ourselves and Others, can be viewed here: 2021 Humanities Days at MC RECORDINGSnew window

2022 Humanities Days may be offered via Zoom or In-Person:

Zoom sessions: All Humanities Days events will be recorded unless otherwise noted by the host at the beginning of their event, or listed in their program description. By participating in Zoom events, you automatically consent to such recording. If you do not consent to being recorded, you may join, but do not connect your microphone or enter text into the attendee chat. Please discuss any concerns with the host, or contact us at HumanitiesDays@montgomerycollege.edu.

In person: Masks are required for all in-person events.

Monday, October 24 click for schedule and registration links

  1. Inclusion through design: The intersectionality between design, usability, and accessibility
  2. Ginnels, Snickets, Twittens and Vennels: Exploring English Dialect and Slang from England, Wales, and the Channel Islands
  3. Linguistic Diversity: Global Englishes
  4. LGBTQIA Film Shorts and Discussion
  5. National Day on Writing
  6. Reach Back, Reach Forward: Using Vintage Table Linens to Make a Mini-Quilt
  7. Salvadoran Literature in the US

Click for schedule and registration links

Inclusion through design
Inclusion through design: The intersectionality  between design, usability, and accessibility

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Host: Stacy Ford, Universal Design Center Coordinator | Accessible Technology Coordinator | stacy.ford@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host: Andrew Scheppler

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Does the design matter? Come and explore how design can help or hinder people from using or accessing content. We engage with digital and print visual content every day, but do we know why or how to communicate why it is hard to use or read? Unpack these barriers and explore how to make content to be usable by more people.

Sponsor: Universal Design Center


Exploring English Dialect and Slang from England, Wales, and the Channel Islands
Ginnels, Snickets, Twittens and Vennels: Exploring English Dialect and Slang from England, Wales, and the Channel Islands

10:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Host: James Murray, Professor, English Language for Academic Purposes | james.murray@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host: Elizabeth Schlackman, MC Library

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Jonnie Robinson, dialectologist and Lead Curator of Spoken English at the British Library, works to promote and validate diverse dialects. He has worked on two prestigious nationwide [U.K.] surveys of vernacular English: the Survey of English Dialects and BBC Voices. He co-curated the British Library's 2010 exhibition, Evolving English: One Language, Many Voices and created the British Accents and Dialects website. Mr. Robinson will present highlights from his latest work, A Thesaurus of English Dialect and Slang (Cambridge UP, 2021). The project documents the linguistic landscape of England, Wales, and the Channel Islands and provides information about each term's origins, location and the social distribution of its users. This presentation will not be recorded."

Recommended media: 
British Library: Selected recordings of music, spoken word, and human and natural environmentnew window
British Library: British accents and dialectsnew window

Sponsors: This event is sponsored by the MC Library, Global Humanities Institute, English Language for Academic Purposes, Linguistics, and Communication Studies


Linguistic Diversity: Global Englishes
Linguistic Diversity: Global Englishes​

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Host:
Karyn Brown, Instructional Associate at the Writing, Reading, and Language Center on the Rockville Campus | karyn.brown@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host:
Jason Youngkin

Register Now


At MC, many students, staff, and faculty speak Global Englishes. In order to serve our community more effectively, this event will help spread awareness of Global Englishes and help us to better understand the linguistic diversity at MC.

Sponsors: English and Reading/Rockville and the Writing, Reading, and Language Center/Rockville


LGBTQIA Film Shorts and Discussion
LGBTQIA Film Shorts and Discussion

12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Host: Deborah Taylor, Professor | deborah.taylor@montgomerycollege.edu 
Co-Host: Shelly Alves

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We will view and discuss a number of several film shorts. The content will be related to issues important to students, and that we hope will help to sustain them. Film topics include coming out, being trans, family conflicts, and cultural/religious conflicts due to identity.

Sponsors: Women and Gender Studies Program, and the Humanities Discipline at TPSS

National Day on Writing
National Day on Writing

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Host: Chip Gladson, Collegewide Coordinator, Writing in the Disciplines | chip.gladson@montgomerycollege.edu 
Co-Host: Shayla Atkins, TPSS Campus Coordinator, Writing in the Disciplines

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Celebrate the National Day on Writing at Montgomery College with Writing in the Disciplines. Discuss how personal writing in the form of journals, poems, stories, songs, blogs and more can connect us to the world: past, present and future. Share your story and enjoy the stories of your fellow Raptors.

Sponsors: Writing in the Disciplines (WID) and Writing, Reading and Language Centers (WRL)

Reach Back, Reach Forward: Using Vintage Table Linens to Make a Mini-Quilt
Reach Back, Reach Forward: Using Vintage Table Linens to Make a Mini-Quilt

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Presenter:
Lauren Kingsland
Host: Sara Ducey | sara.ducey@montgomerycollege.edu
IN PERSON – Science Center, #152, RV Campus | Rockville Campus Mapnew window

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Hands-on workshop led by local quilt artist Lauren Kingsland. Participants will learn to hand sew a small quilt from vintage table linens and other natural fibers. Create! Sustain your spirit! All supplies provided.  Limited seating: register early.

Sponsor: The Paul Peck Humanities Institute

Salvadoran Literature in the US
Salvadoran Literature in the US

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Host: Ellen Olmstead, Professor | ellen.olmstead@montgomerycollege.edu
IN PERSON – CM#221, TPSS Campus | Takoma Park/Silver Spring Campus Mapnew window

Register Now


Learn about the history of literature by Salvadorans and Salvadoran Americans through a mini lecture and multimedia introduction to some of the writers.

Tuesday, October 25 click for schedule and registration links

  1. What is Globalization? Who Does it Serve? How Can We Create Globalization that is Sustainable?
  2. Advance the Dialogue: LGBTQ+ People and Families
  3. Sidewalk Talk at Germantown Campus
  4. Sidewalk Talk at Takoma-Park Silver Spring Campus
  5. Robert L. Giron Global Humanities Institute Lecture Series Presents: Kim Roberts – Love, Death and Poetry
  6. Interdisciplinary Merits of Primary Source Labs in Humanities
  7. Welcoming Spaces to Explore Literature, (Un)Common Lived Experience, and Community
  8. Free Minds Book Club and Writing Workshop: Incarcerated Youth Writing New Chapters in their Lives
  9. Our Patterns, Montgomery College, with  Artist-in-Residence Natan Diacon-Furtado 

Click for schedule and registration links

What is Globalization?
What is Globalization? Who Does it Serve? How Can We Create Globalization that is Sustainable?​

11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Host: Deborah Taylor, Professor | deborah.taylor@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host:
Shelly Alves

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The audience will explore definitions of globalization. We look at the possibility of a sustainable approach to globalization. We will view and discuss video clips – that talk about people, profit, and the planet; we will examine how viable this construct is for our world.

Sponsors: GHUM101, Global Humanities Institute and the Humanities Discipline at TPSS


Advance the Dialogue: LGBTQ+ People and Families
Advance the Dialogue: LGBTQ+ People and Families

11:00 a.m. -12:15 p.m.
Host:
Esther Schwartz-McKinzie, English and Reading, TPSS | esther.schwartz-mckinzie@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host:
Rita Kranidis

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Join author, and MC professor Esther Schwartz-McKinzie for a peek into her soon-to-be published book, Speaking Out: Families of LGBTQ+ Advance the Dialogue (2022, Gival Press.) This book, inspired by Esther’ daughter, pushes back against current hateful anti-LGBTQ+ politics and trends, and includes 19 interviews with LGBTQ+ people and families. We hope it will serve as a prompt for discussion about diversity and inclusion. Kim Capps will perform a song titled, "Don't Bury Them." This discussion will not be recorded.

Recommended Media:
Speaking Out: Families of LGBTQ+ Advance the Dialoguenew window

Sponsors: The Paul Peck Humanities Institute and English and Reading Department, TPSS


Sidewalk Talk at Germantown Campus
Sidewalk Talk at Germantown Campus

11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. 
IN PERSON
– Cafeteria, Ground floor of the Humanities and Social Sciences Building (HS), GT Campus | Germantown Campus Mapnew window

*Registration is not required
Host: Hannah Stocks, Student Life, GT | hannah.stocks@montgomerycollege.edu
A Sidewalk Talk is a community listening event with trained listeners who provide heart-centered, judgment-free listening about anything you want to talk about. 

Volunteers will provide empathic listening. Listening is what connects us to each other and affirms us. It's what gives us a sense of belonging and makes us human. Our MC volunteers will provide empathic listening.

Recommended Media: You Talk, We Listen - Sidewalk Talk.orgnew window
Sponsors: Office of Student Life’s Service-Learning Program and Department of Communications


Sidewalk Talk at Takoma-Park Silver Spring Campus
Sidewalk Talk at Takoma-Park Silver Spring Campus

11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. 
IN PERSON
– Second floor, ST Building, TPSS Campus | Takoma Park/Silver Spring Campus Map

*Registration is not required
A Sidewalk Talk is a community listening event with trained listeners who provide heart-centered, judgment-free listening about anything you want to talk about.   
Host: Stacey Peterson, Department Chair, ELAP, Linguistics and Communication Studies | stacey.peterson@montgomerycollege.edu

Volunteers will provide empathic listening. Listening is what connects us to each other and affirms us. It's what gives us a sense of belonging and makes us human. Our MC volunteers will provide empathic listening.

Recommended Media: You Talk, We Listen - sidewalk-talk.orgnew window
Sponsors: Student Affairs/Service Learning at Takoma Park/Silver Spring and Germantown 


Kim Roberts – Love, Death and Poetry
Robert L. Giron Global Humanities Institute Lecture Series Presents: Kim Roberts – Love, Death and Poetry

12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.
Host:
Cinder Cooper Barnes, Professor and Director of GHI | cinder.cooper@montgomerycollege.edu
Presenter:
Kim Roberts

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Kim Roberts will be reading selected poems, talking about why we turn to poems at times of deep emotion, and discussing poets who have influenced her from DC’s rich literary history. 

She is an award-winning poet and literary historian residing in Washington, DC. Author of six books of poems, editor of two anthologies, and co-editor of the web exhibit DC Writers’ Homes. 

Recommended Media: Kim Roberts - An award-winning poet and literary historiannew window
Sponsor: Global Humanities Institute


Interdisciplinary Merits of Primary Source Labs in Humanities
Interdisciplinary Merits of Primary Source Labs in Humanities

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

FACULTY-ONLY WORKSHOP VIA ZOOM - (Register via MC Learns)

Register Now

Facilitator: Professor Sylvea Hollis, African and African  American History | sylvea.hollis@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-host: Angela Lanier 

This presentation will provide a general overview of the interdisciplinary merits of primary source labs in humanities classrooms. It will provide attendees with the following: examples of OERS (open educational resources), digital classroom tools to help students ask critical humanities-based questions, examples of hard and soft skills labs provide students, feedback from students about strengths and weakness of framework, and suggestions for ways to adapt labs in DLs, STRs, and in-person classes. 

Photo detail and credit: 1923, Madison County, Alabama. [African-American] agents and rural nurse with movable school. [The Booker T. Washington Agricultural School on Wheels.], Department of Agriculture. Office of the Secretary. Office of Information. 1925-ca. 1981
The Booker T. Washington Agricultural School on Wheelsnew window

Sponsor: E-Learning, Innovation, and Teaching Excellence (ELITE)


Welcoming Spaces to Explore Literature
Welcoming Spaces to Explore Literature, (Un)Common Lived Experience, and Community ​

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Host: Elizabeth Benton, Dean of English and Reading | elizabeth.benton@montgomerycollege.edu 
Co-Hosts: Leah Sneider, Jessica Hall, and Comfort Davis Mingot

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This presentation will provide us the space to discuss how our book talk group has kept us connected to colleagues across the college during and since the pandemic. It has helped us put aside the challenges of the workplace, the classroom, and the myriad demands we experience. It has brought us together to encounter someone else's journey. During this session, we will experience "In This Place An American Lyric" by Amanda Gorman.

Recommended Media: Poets.orgnew window
Sponsor: The English and Reading Discipline


Free Minds Book Club and Writing Workshop
Free Minds Book Club and Writing Workshop: Incarcerated Youth Writing New Chapters in their Lives

7:30 p.m. - 8:45 p.m.
Host:
Shelley Jones, Professor of Spanish | shelley.jones@montgomerycollege.edu 
Co-Host: Carlos Alonzo Avila

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Previously incarcerated youth will tell their stories and share how the power of poetry and literature helped to transform their lives. As part of the event, participants will have the opportunity to read poems and provide written encouragement to current incarcerated poets using Miro, a collaborative whiteboard platform bringing people together to comment in one space.

Recommended Media: Free Minds Book Club and Writing workshopnew window
Sponsor: The Paul Peck Humanities Institute

Our Patterns, Montgomery College, with Artist-in-Residence Natan Diacon-Furtado
Our Patterns, Montgomery College, with Artist-in-Residence Natan Diacon-Furtado

Part I: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Part II: 6:15 – 7:30 p.m.

Presenter: Natan Diacon-Furtado 
Host: Amanda Miller, Art Professor, Germantown  Art Coordinator, Special Projects Coordinator | amanda.miller@montgomerycollege.edu

Register Now

PART I VIA ZOOM, 11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Register Now

PART II IN–PERSON, 6:15-7:30 p.m., outdoors in the "quad" area between HS, HT, and SA, GT Campus | Germantown Campus Mapnew window

Led by artist Natan Diacon-Furtado, Our Patterns, Montgomery College united students in six 2D Design studio classes in the creation of a community “quilt” of patterns. Created virtually, this project was designed to have an impactful physical presence through a stunning projection display of light and pattern interacting with brick-and-mortar architecture. 

Please join us for Part I, a conversation with artist Natan Diacon-Furtado to learn more about the artwork “quilt” of patterns project and how it fostered community in the remote environment, as well as also register for Part II, to view the evening installation of the “quilt” of patterns which will be a spectacular display of student designs projected onto buildings on the Germantown Campus! *Light refreshments will be served during Part II, our evening art projection onto the buildings. 

Recommended Media: The full project can be viewed on Instagram @mc_artistinresidence. Youtube Videonew window 

Sponsors: Artist in Residence Program, MC Arts Institute, Germantown Art Department 

Wednesday, October 26 click for schedule and registration links

  1. What Does it Mean to be a Journalist in Afghanistan?
  2. Every Vote Counts: Close Elections in the United States
  3. A Dialogue Regarding MC's Community- Informed Policing Initiatives:  Will Enhanced Training Enhance Service?
  4. Returning Stolen Art
  5. Storytelling: A Fundamental Part of Being Human
  6. Banning Books: The Realities of Forbidding Expression

Click for schedule and registration links

Using personal narrative in education as a cognitive and social justice strategy
What Does it Mean to be a Journalist in Afghanistan?

9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Presenter:
Taqi Daryabi 
Host:
Professor Sadi Ahmad, English Languages for Academic Purposes | sadi.ahmad@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host:
Professor Karl T. Smith, History and Political Science

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Taqi Daryabi, an Afghani journalist and social activist, shares the hopes, fears and challenges of reporting in Afghanistan. Taqi is currently a student at Montgomery College, enrolled in the ELAP program, and encourages professional journalism organizations and journalism students to attend.

This presentation may contain content that some attendees find disturbing. Trigger and content warning: war, violence, abuse, and oppression. Attendee discretion advised. Offering content and trigger warnings is a form of safety and grants people agency over their mental health and well-being.

Sponsors: Departments of English Language for Academic Purposes and History and Political Science, Takoma Park/Silver Spring campus


Every Vote Counts:Close Elections in the United States
Every Vote Counts: Close Elections in the United States

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Host:
Jennifer Haydel, Professor of Political Science | jennifer.haydel@montgomerycollege.edu
IN–PERSON –
HT216, Germantown Campus, Park in Lot 4 | Germantown Campus Map

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This interactive event will explore the history of close elections (i.e. elections that end in ties or very close margins) in US politics, with a particular emphasis on state and local elections.

Sponsors: The Humanities Department, Germantown


A Dialogue Regarding MC's Community- Informed Policing Initiatives
A Dialogue Regarding MC's Community- Informed Policing Initiatives: Will Enhanced Training Enhance Service?

12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Host:
Ginger Robinson, Department Chair – Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice | ginger.robinson@montgomerycollege.edu 
Co-Hosts:
Vincent Intondi, Sonia Pruitt, and Ann Johnson

Register Now

 
This dialogue is designed to provide members of the MC community with an opportunity to discuss whether the college should participate in the county's proposed community-informed policing initiative by offering supplemental training to officers. Participants will also be provided with an opportunity to inform the curriculum, which currently includes topics such as conflict resolution, history, communications, racial equity, health and wellness, and social justice.

Sponsors: IRJC and Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice


Returning Stolen Art
Returning Stolen Art

1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Host:
Ken Jassie, Professor of Art History | ken.jassie@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host:
Sara Ducey

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2022 has witnessed an unprecedented effort by Western Museums to repatriate African art objects plundered during the Colonial era. This lecture will focus on the so-called "Benin Bronzes," from the infamous Punitive Expedition of 1897 to the recent restoration by the Smithsonian and other institutions of these priceless artifacts.

Sponsors: The Paul Peck Humanities Institute and the Art Department, Rockville campus


Storytelling: A Fundamental Part of Being Human
Storytelling: A Fundamental Part of Being Human

5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Host:
Gloria Barron | gloria.barron@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host:
Jennifer Baugh

Register Now

 

“Stories are our primary tools of learning and teaching, the repositories of our lore and legends. They bring order into our confusing world. Think about how many times a day you use stories to pass along data, insights, memories or common-sense advice.” – Edward Miller. Storytelling is one of the oldest forms of communication. Sharing experiences and engaging audiences through stories continues to be relevant today. The interaction between the storyteller and the listener is a powerful means that brings people together, makes connections that promote empathy and critical thinking, and improves cultural understanding.  

By the end of this workshop series, participants will be able to: 

  • Describe the effectiveness of digital storytelling
  • Describe the digital storytelling process
  • Identify how digital storytelling can be effective in the classroom

Recommended Media: Invisible Woundsnew window 
Sponsor: Computer Science Department, Rockville campus 


Banning Books: The Realities of Forbidding Expression
Banning Books: The Realities of Forbidding Expression

6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Hosts:
Professor Rita Kranidis, English and Reading, TPSS | rita.kranidis@montgomerycollege.edu and Jennifer Hatleberg, Head Librarian, Arts and Humanities, MC Library | Jennifer.hatleberg@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host:
Andrew Scheppler, IT

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An exploration into the kinds of books that have been banned in the past and reactions to it. Discussion of Salman Rushdie’s “banned book,“ The Satanic Verses and the recent events concerning this book.

Sponsor: The Paul Peck Humanities Institute, and Global Humanities Institute

Thursday, October 27 click for schedule and registration links

  1. A Dialogue Regarding MC's Community-Informed Policing Initiatives: Will Enhanced Training Enhance Service?
  2. 10th Annual Ethics Essay Contest: The Ethics of Genetic Testing
  3. Adam Smith and Scottish Enlightenment  — Morality and Markets Host: Satarupa Das, Professor, Economics
  4. Did the Pandemic Change Humanities, or Did We Change Our Humanities Teaching?
  5. Music, Dance and Culture from Ukraine

Click for schedule and registration links

A Dialogue Regarding MC's Community-Informed Policing Initiatives
A Dialogue Regarding MC's Community-Informed Policing Initiatives: Will Enhanced Training Enhance Service?

11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
*This program is offered twice on two separate days, via Zoom (9/26) and in-person (9/27). Register for one.

Host: Ginger Robinson, Department Chair - Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice | ginger.robinson@montgomerycollege.edu 
Co-Hosts: Vincent Intondi, Sonia Pruitt, and Ann Johnson
IN–PERSON: CF 101, TPSS Campus | Takoma Park/Silver Spring Campus Mapnew window

Register Now


This dialogue is designed to provide members of the MC community with an opportunity to discuss whether the college should participate in the county's proposed community-informed policing initiative by offering supplemental training to officers. Participants will also be provided with an opportunity to inform the curriculum, which currently includes topics such as conflict resolution, history, communications, racial equity, health and wellness, and social justice.

Sponsor: IRJC and Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice


10th Annual Ethics Essay Contest
10th Annual Ethics Essay Contest: The Ethics of Genetic Testing

11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Host:
Daniel Jenkins, Professor Philosophy | daniel.jenkins2@montgomerycollege.edu
*Registration is not required

Launch Zoom Link


Students will be invited to write an essay in which they explore ethical issues related to genetic testing, such as health record privacy, health care access, and discrimination. Points will be supported using ethical theories or moral principles. A winner will be selected and invited to share their essay during an event in which additional background and context are provided, and more general discussion will be facilitated.

Sponsor: Humanities


Adam Smith and Scottish Enlightenment
Adam Smith and Scottish Enlightenment-Morality and Markets

11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Host:
Satarupa Das, Professor, Economics | satarupa.das@montgomerycollege.edu

IN PERSON – TPSS Campus, CM 211 ​| Takoma Park/Silver Spring Campus Map

Register Now


The event will screen a video and hold discussion on it. The Real Adam Smith - Morality and Markets is a narrative that blends history, philosophy and economics in the 18th Century. The video is 57 minutes long. Adam Smith lived in the age of Scottish Enlightenment. He considered himself first and foremost a moral philosopher. Smith is considered to be the “father of modern economics”. The revolutionary ideas he penned in The Wealth of Nations and The Theory of Moral Sentiments, changed the world. Morality and Markets takes an intriguing look at Smith, his background and the evolution of his ideas, both economic and ethical.

Sponsor: Department of Business and Economics, TPSS


Did the Pandemic Change Humanities, or Did We Change Our Humanities Teaching?
Did the Pandemic Change Humanities, or Did We Change Our Humanities Teaching?

5:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

FACULTY-ONLY WORKSHOP VIA ZOOM - (Register via MC Learns)

Register Now


Host: Professor Dianne Cherry, Communications Studies | dianne.cherry@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host: Professor Mitchell Tropin 
During this Zoom session, faculty participants will describe their teaching experiences since March 2020, and share with colleagues "lessons learned," as we return to our classrooms.

Sponsor: E-Learning, Innovation, and Teaching Excellence (ELITE)


Music, Dance and Culture from Ukraine
Music, Dance and Culture from Ukraine
*In-person events are first come, first seated.

Part I, PRE-CONCERT DISCUSSION: 6:15 p.m. – 6:45 p.m. 
Attend in person: Music Building Recital Hall, MU 126, RV Campus | Rockville Campus Map

There will be a short pre-concert discussion by cultural anthropologist and award-winning musician Solomia Gorokhivska with MC Anthropology students addressing the history and contemporary importance of Ukrainian music. The discussion will include perspectives on the value of art and the humanities particularly during times of conflict. Facilitator: Dr. Maria Sprehn, Professor of Anthropology | maria.sprehn@montgomerycollege.edu


PART II, CONCERT: 7:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. 
Attend in person: Music Building Recital Hall, MU 126, RV Campus | Rockville Campus Map

To watch live online:
REGISTER FOR THE STREAMING ARTS EVENTS
Ukrainian musicians and dancers, Gerdan Musicnew window, will perform a one-hour concert at the Rockville Campus. This performance is part of a larger residency program sponsored by Arts Institute, Anthropology, Photography, and Paul Peck Humanities Institute, held on both Rockville and Germantown campuses. Presenters: Elizabeth Melanson, Arts Institute | elizabeth.melanson@montgomerycollege.edu, Dean Frank Trezza |frank.trezza@montgomerycollege.edu, and Dr. Dawn Avery | dawn.avery@montgomerycollege.edu, Full Professor, World Arts Festival producer.

Recommended Media:
MC Fall22 Arts Calendar (PDF, Get Adobe Acrobat PDF Reader.-Link opens in new window.)  
Ukraine Tribute: Gerdan on Millennium Stagenew window

Sponsors: Arts Institute, Anthropology, Photography, and The Paul Peck Humanities Institute

Friday, October 28 click for schedule and registration links

  1. Sligo Journal Poetry Reading and Discussion
  2. All Humanities are Local
  3. NIMBY (Not In My Backyard): “Cancel Culture” and the Slippery Slope of Anti-Immigrant Sentiment
  4. A Workshop in Digital Storytelling
  5. "Kreyòl Pale, Kreyòl Konprann" (Creole Spoken, Creole Understood): Presentations in Celebration of International Creole Day

Click for schedule and registration links

Sligo Journal Poetry Reading and Discussion
Sligo Journal Poetry Reading and Discussion

9:00 a.m. -10:30 a.m.
Host: Greg Wahl, Professor of English TPSS and Contributing Editor | Gregory.wahl@montgomerycollege.edu, Sligo Journal with Michael LeBlanc, Professor of English TPSS and Editor-in-Chief | michael.leblanc@montgomerycollege.edu, Sligo Journal and David Lott, Professor of ELAP TPSS and Poetry Editor, Sligo Journal | david.lott@montgomerycollege.edu

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Poets published in Montgomery College’s journal of literature and the arts, The Sligo Journal, including MC faculty, staff, and/or student poets, will read and discuss their poems. MC students who are studying the poems will help lead discussion.

Recommended Media: The Sligo Journal

Sponsors: English and Reading Department, TPSS; English Language for Academic Purposes Department (ELAP), TPSS; Visual and Performing Arts Department, TPSS 


All Humanities are Local
All Humanities are Local

10:30 a.m. - Noon
Guest Presenters: Professor Andrew Nolan and Professor Sunil Dasgupta  
Host: Professor Joe Stumpf, Rockville Chair for History and Political Science | joseph.strumpf@montgomerycollege.edu
IN–PERSON: TC 136, RV Campus | Rockville Campus Mapnew window

Register Now


Today, people know more about the White House than they do their own state legislature; more about the Statue of Liberty than public art in their local town squares; more about nearby megalopolises than their own neighborhoods. There is a hole in the foundation of democracy, both caused by and shaping debates about our shared national values. Come hear how historians and political scientists assess the ongoing decline of local media, the erosion of local culture, and the thinning of the neighborly ties that bind. Share in a discussion about what we all might do to put local scenery back at the heart of national visions. Andrew Nolan (History Professor) and Sunil Dasgupta (Political Science Program Director) both from UMBC at Shady Grove will present.

Sponsor: History and Political Science Department, Rockville


NIMBY (Not In My Backyard)
NIMBY (Not In My Backyard): “Cancel Culture” and the Slippery Slope of Anti-Immigrant Sentiment

12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Host: Jenny Hodges, Professor, Communication Studies | jenny.hodges@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host: Jennifer Baugh

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Cancel culture and character assassination have long been theoretical ideas and ongoing practices in communities across the United States (U.S.), particularly in those whose members don’t necessarily share commonalities such as country of birth, English as a native or primary language, citizenship, along with other racial and ethnic characteristics. Using a sampling of communities across the United States as the setting for anti-immigrant rhetoric, this presentation will examine the correlation between language promoted and action taken within these communities in recent decades that suggest a slippery slope into character assassination of immigrant populations. As Montgomery College is an MSI (Minority Serving Institution) and HSI (Hispanic Serving Institution), we must be armed with information and resources to support our immigrant students who face the highest levels of anti-immigrant sentiment that our country has experienced in recent decades.


A Workshop in Digital Storytelling
A Workshop in Digital Storytelling

1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Host:
Matthew Decker, Associate Professor | matthew.decker@montgomerycollege.edu
Co-Host:
Megan Howard

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The Digital Storytelling Internship at Montgomery College is excited to host an introduction to digital storytelling with the broader college community. The co-coordinators of the Internship as well as the Level One Interns will review the process, share sample practice prompts with the audience, and then set aside time for breakout rooms in which the fall 2022 interns will lead brainstorming “story circles” with the audience. Time-permitting, we look forward to sharing details about the video editing process and various video editing platforms, too.

Recommended Media:  
Connecting Through Digital Storytellingnew window
Sponsor: The Paul Peck Humanities Institute's Digital Storytelling Internship Program 


"Kreyòl Pale, Kreyòl Konprann" (Creole Spoken, Creole Understood): Presentations in Celebration of International Creole Day
"Kreyòl Pale, Kreyòl Konprann" (Creole Spoken, Creole Understood): Presentations in Celebration of International Creole Day

6:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Host:  James Murray, Professor, English Language for Academic Purposes |  james.murray@montgomerycollege.edu
Purposes Co-Host: Laurie Williams, Project Manager, Academic Affairs, MoCo Caribbean American Advisory Group

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This annual Montgomery County event features scholarly lectures on the status of Caribbean creole languages. The purpose of International Creole Day is to confront the stereotype of creole languages being substandard dialects, incapable of expressing academic and scientific ideas. This year, the speakers will be (1) Dr. Jo-Anne Ferreira, head of the linguistics department at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad and Tobago; (2) Dr. Lunine Pierre-Jerome, translator into Haitian Creole of The Color Purple (Alice Walker) and Breath, Eyes, and Memory (Edwidge Danticat) and instructor at UMass Boston’s Summer Haitian Creole Institute; and (3) Haitian-American composer and conductor, Sydney Guillaume.   

Recommended Media: 
Rezèvwa Zouti Kreyòlnew window
JEBCA EDITIONSnew window
Sydney Guillaumenew window

Sponsors: This event is sponsored by the Global Humanities Institute, English Language for Academic Purposes, Linguistics, Communication Studies, and co-sponsored by the Committee for the Advancement of Creole Language (KOMALAK).

 

2022 Humanities Days Committee

Cinder Barnes | Global Humanities Institute director and Professor of English, Takoma Park/Silver Spring 
Jennifer Baugh | Creative Project Manager, Office of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs 
Dianne Cherry | Professor of Communication Studies, Takoma Park/Silver Spring 
Sara Ducey | Paul Peck Humanities Institute director 
Kyoko Enomoto | Analyst/Programmer Web Services 
Stacy Ford | Accessible Technology Coordinator & MC Universal Design Center Coordinator 
Shelley Jones | Professor of Spanish, World Languages, Takoma Park/Silver Spring 
Angela Lanier | Instructional Designer, ELITE 
Om Rusten | Administrative Aide II, Campus Commons, Rockville 
Andrew Scheppler | Interim Rockville IT Campus Manager

This, our 10th Annual Humanities Days at Montgomery College, focuses on The Power of the Humanities to Sustain and Serve. Please join us for presentations, dialogues, workshops and panels. Learn about cultural and religious conflicts due to one’s identity; explore how to make content to be usable by more people; listen to linguistic landscapes, understand the complexity of identity; connect to our past, present and future through personal writing; study the history of literature by Salvadoran authors; explore definitions of globalization; advance the LGBTQ dialogue; talk about anything and be heard; turn to poems in times of deep emotion; connect with colleagues and encounter someone else’s journey through Amanda Gorman’s poetry; provide written encouragement to incarcerated poets; see spectacular student designs projected onto buildings; hear the hopes, fears and challenges of an Afghani reporter; explore the history of close elections; inform policing initiatives; pore over the recent restoration of the "Benin Bronzes” by the Smithsonian; identify how digital storytelling can be effective in the classroom; discuss Salman Rushdie’s “banned book,“ The Satanic Verses; explore ethical issues related to genetic testing; screen and discuss The Real Adam Smith - Morality and Markets; experience music, dance and culture from Ukraine; hear poetry readings from The Sligo Journal; discuss how to put local scenery back at the heart of national visions; examine “Cancel Culture” and the slippery slope of anti-immigrant sentiment within a sampling of communities across the United States; participate in digital storytelling “story circles”; and confront the stereotyping of creole languages.  
The Humanities are here to sustain and serve.

MC Disclosure

Here are the facts about this week’s Humanities Days virtual presentations, dialogues, workshops, and panels and privacy as it relates to Zoom and your participation:

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    For more information on Zoom privacy: https://zoom.us/privacynew window